About Rod Cullen

I am a Senior Lecturer in Learning and Teaching Technologies in the Learning Innovation Team at Manchester Metropolitan University. I have gained considerable experience over almost 20 years in design, delivery and evaluation of online learning, teaching and assessment. I am particularly interested in assessment and feedback practice as well as the emerging role of web conferencing technologies to support blended and distance learning.

TLC Survey 2017 – Your feedback is needed!

Hi All,

We are at the end of another series of Teaching and Learning and Conversations and are about to take a two month summer break.

Thanks to all of the TLC facilitators and participants for contributing to yet another interesting and stimulating series.

We think that now is a good time to take stock and reflect upon the overall TLC experience and would like to get some feedback from you to help us in this respect.

Whether you are a participant, presenter or both, please would you be so kind as to take a little bit of time to complete the TLC 2017 survey at the link below.

https://mmu.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/tlc-survey-2016

Many thanks in advance,

The TLC Team

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Lego for Creative Strategic Thinking with MBA Students

A teaching and learning conversation with:

 LisaDay Lisa Day

Director of Studies – Online MBA, University of Liverpool

 JeannieHolstein Jeannie Holstein

Module Convenor Strategic Management MBA, University of Nottingham

About this conversation:

This conversation is an opportunity to share with you our experiences of using Lego to stimulate creative strategic thinking with MBA students. We both attended a workshop session run by Dr David Oliver from the University of Sydney Business School in 2015 and came away with a great deal of enthusiasm about trying out his ideas with our students. We will share with you some of the theory behind using Lego to encourage students to work through strategic problems in a way that is collaborative, reflective and creative. We will try to make our talk participative so you get a chance to try a few things and not just listen to us. We both have experience of running a taught classroom-based session(s) that lasts between 1 hour and 3 hours for about 5 to 25 MBA students. We will share our experiences from running these classes and the lessons that we learned from putting David’s ideas into practice. If you don’t teach strategy or MBA students then you will still, we hope, pick up lots of ideas that you could adapt for other audiences.

About Lisa and Jeannie:

Dr Lisa Day is a senior lecturer with the University of Liverpool and Director of Studies for their Online MBA programme. She recently moved to the university from London Metropolitan University where she taught MBA Strategic Management for over 11 years. Earlier this year she gained her PhD from Bath University, in the area of ‘Strategy as Practice’, and is now working to publish her research. Lisa also has an MA in Higher Education and is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. She became interested in using Lego with MBA students after attending a workshop, along with Jeannie, at the Academy of Management Conference in Vancouver in 2015.

Dr Jeannie Holstein is Assistant Professor at Nottingham University Business School and convenes and teaches on the Strategic Management Module on their MBA. She gained her PhD from Nottingham in 2014. Her first degree was in Modern History at Oxford University and she completed an Executive MBA at the University of Nottingham in 2005. An experienced business strategist, she worked in the fine china industry for a leading European consumer brand in her first career, running its UK subsidiary, prior to transitioning to an academic career.  Jeannie’s research interest lies in the narrative practice of strategy and she recently published work from her thesis in the journal Strategic Organization. She had no clue that Lego could be so usefully employed in the classroom until enlightenment in Vancouver in 2015.

When: Tuesday 20th June 12-30-13.30 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Capturing learning: beyond the acquisition metaphor

A teaching and learning conversation with:

 paul_orsmond Paul Orsmond 

Senior lecturer in the School of Life Sciences and Education at Staffordshire University

 rachel_forsyth Rachel Forsyth

Associate Head of CELT, Manchester Metropolitan, University

About this conversation:

This conversation is intended to provoke discussion about the role of assessment in higher education. A common model of higher education characterises the role of the teacher as delivering the curriculum to support achievement of learning outcomes; this tends to place primary, value on what is taught in the identified curriculum, with a much lesser value for what students learn outside this. The focus is on ‘getting a qualification’, and the teacher’s role is to help students to do this. Hence learning is seen as an individual event, using an acquisition metaphor to show how  value has been added the students’ knowledge and capabilities. Participation may be covered by the occasional group project, possibly added into the curriculum in a slightly clumsy way, to tick the outcome of ‘work in teams’.  Here learning gain is seen as an accumulation of acquired knowledge. Another model sees an undergraduate programme of study as bringing about a change in identity and providing the student with the ability to integrate into one or more communities of practice, which were inaccessible to the student before beginning the course. Here  the emphasis to be placed on learning through the participation – thus knowledge is not just something the student possesses but something a student does. Here learning gain is seen more in terms of students moving from being legitimate peripheral participants towards becoming more full members of a community of practice.

Current models of assessment in UK HE tend to favour the first of these models, but in so doing may only assess a tiny portion of all that students learn at university. This conversation hopes to more fully explore the learning that occurs in university through student identity development.

About Paul and Rachel:

Paul is a senior lecturer in the School of Life Sciences and Education at Staffordshire University.  As an educator in biosciences he has explored student learning and how it is linked to assessment and feedback.  In particular he has been interested in communities of learning that students develop and the social interaction that they undertake outside the overt curriculum while carrying out self- and peer-assessment practices in order to make sense of their learning experiences.

Rachel works in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University.  She is particularly interested in quality assurance, curriculum management and assessment in higher education.

When: Monday 6th March 2017 12:30-13:30 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

1minutecpd – Follow-up post

The webinar that Chris and I hosted was an exploration of our 1minuteCPD project. 1minuteCPD is a yearlong experiment in micro learning to address digital capabilities in Higher Education. It is openly available and has been created by colleagues from Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester (see: Meet the authors).

Chris and I were really pleased to have this opportunity to discuss the 1minuteCPD project more widely with the HE community. It was great to see so many attendees to the webinar, from all over the world, engaged in a lively discussion about the merits and challenges of 1minuteCPD and micro-learning more generally. A recording of our TLC is now available on the website and you may also be interested in the recording of our recent presentation on 1minutecpd at ALT-C in September.

From our perspective, we were really interested to learn what brought people to 1minuteCPD and what encouraged them to keep coming back. During the discussions, it appeared that many people believed that the length of the posts was essential to its success and that longer posts, even to just 5 minutes, would not have been as popular. Others felt that longer posts could have an appeal, especially if they could link more explicitly to the pedagogy, however most agreed they would not engage with a longer format on a daily basis. For those interested in a slightly longer format, check out the great resource www.telu.me, which has been created by a consortium of Universities based in Ireland.

It was great to see that many would like to see 1minuteCPD become more of a community led project and has certainly given us food for thought. If you have any suggestions as to how 1minuteCPD could be opened up to the community, we would love to hear your ideas.

Kate & Chris

Please contact us on k.soper@mmu.ac.uk or c.meadows@mmu.ac.uk or on Twitter @KatesSoper @cjmeadows

Using social media for belonging and bonding

A teaching and learning conversation with:

 danielle_dhayer Danielle D’Hayer 

Associate professor Interpreting Studies at London Metropolitan University

About this conversation:

Do you remember the excitement of joining a new course? Do you also remember how nervous you were the day before coming to class? How easy was it to engage in a conversation with classmates? Not even to mention the tutor?

Well, it does not have to be like that.

First, because tutors are as nervous as students. But this is a well-kept secret.

Second, because new technologies and social media allow us to connect, interact, contribute, listen, learn and socialise at any time and anywhere.

They key question is: how do I connect with students and peers using new technologies? What social media should I consider? Isn’t this dangerous or even a waste of time? Don’t we have enough to do already? Does it really work?

Add these questions to yours and the one hour webinar will feel like 5 minutes.

Why don’t you join us to try to answer these questions together? I don’t guarantee we find all the answers but I am certain we can share some good experience and tips.

I will share 3 main case studies with you:

1.     Meeting on Google Communities before, during and after the course

2.     Twitter: an invitation to bond beyond the classroom

3.     Virtual classes: moving from competition to collaboration.

We can already start our conversation on Twitter if you wish. Follow me on Twitter @DDhayer. We can use the official hashtag #tlcwebinars

About Danielle:

I am Associate professor Interpreting Studies at London Metropolitan University and the course leader for the MA Conference Interpreting and the MA Interpreting. I am a trained interpreter myself.

I am a PhD student. The title of my thesis is: ‘In what ways do (virtual) Communities of Practice facilitate successful learning in the context of professional development for interpreting students and practitioners?’

I have been using new technologies in the classroom since 2008. Technologies and social media are now fully integrated to our daily activities. As such, I have tried to integrate them to our daily formal and informal interactions to enhance not only the learning experience but also the way we interact within and beyond the boundaries of the classroom.  I try to create learning spaces and offer opportunities to safely experiment interactions that may inspire students, staff, alumni and employers connected to the course to grow together. Learning on a course and the classroom experience are only a wonderful excuse to discover new selves, new horizons and elaborate new visions of the world we live in.

When: Tuesday 13th December 2016 12:30-13:30 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

1minuteCPD: Experimenting with micro-learning

A teaching and learning conversation with:

kate_soper
Kate SoperManchester Metropolitan University
chris_meadowsChris Meadows

Manchester Metropolitan University

When: Tuesday 22nd November 12:00-13:00 UK Time (60 minutes)

About this conversation:

1minuteCPD is an openly shared, staff development project designed and developed by colleagues from Manchester Metropolitan University and The University of Manchester. Taking a head-on approach to the “no time” excuse for not engaging in staff development, 1minuteCPD has explored micro-learning as a method for developing digital capabilities in higher education.

This webinar is a chance to discuss the lessons learnt from 1minuteCPD, the merits and challenges of micro-learning for teaching and learning more widely, and explore what’s next on the 1minuteCPD journey.

If you are aware of any research papers in micro-learning, please feel free to share these during the webinar.

About Kate and Chris:

Kate and Chris are part of the wider 1minuteCPD team (See: Meet the authors). Both currently work at Manchester Metropolitan University as Technology Enhanced Learning Advisors. In their roles, they are responsible for the development of staff around learning technologies and exploring the pedagogical applications of technology within Higher Education.

Selected Publications:

 

1minutecpd blog page: https://1minutecpd.wordpress.com/

Meet the authors: Meet the authors

1minuteCPD:  A year of Micro learning (ALT Blog): https://altc.alt.ac.uk/blog/2016/02/5459/#gref

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Sam Illingworth reflects on his TLC, using poetry in teaching

The webinar that I hosted as part of the Teaching and Learning Conversations was designed to introduce ways of using poetry in higher educational teaching. It was a really enjoyable webinar to host, as there was plenty of discussion and a passionate (and at times rapid) sharing of ideas. I had hoped that the webinar would help to demystify the use of poetry in the classroom, and that it would encourage people that poetry is a beautiful, thought-provoking and fun medium.

At the beginning of the webinar a couple of the participants expressed their apprehension and fear of poetry, especially in relation to analysing and writing poetry, but by using a simple analytical tool (based on the first verse of this Rudyard Kipling poem) everyone was soon very much engaged in pulling apart the following poem from the American Beat Poet Richard Brautigan:

At the California Institute of Technology
I don’t care how God-damn smart
these guys are: I’m bored.

It’s been raining like hell all day long
and there’s nothing to do.

There were some really interesting discussions in terms of how the poem made people feel, who they thought was writing it, and why they liked/disliked it. By the end of the discussion the participants were beginning to feel more comfortable with analysing poetry, and judging from their responses it was clear that they were making connections with their own experiences and learning journeys, which is exactly what poetry has the capacity to do!

After writing some fun acrostic poems for the TLC acronym there was a group discussion in which numerous suggestions for how to use poetry in a higher education setting were made. All of the contributions were innovative, but I particularly enjoyed the idea of using poetry to explore other people’s perspective, as this can be an extremely powerful tool and chimes with some of the wonderful work that Kirsten Jack is doing at Manchester Met with student nurses and poetry. I also really liked the suggestion of a lunchtime poetry club, which is something that I hope we can develop over the coming weeks for the higher education community, so watch this space!

By the end of the session I think that I had managed to convince the participants that poetry is anything but scary, and that it has the potential to really open up discussions amongst students, and can even help to develop engagement. A link to the webinar can be found below, and I encourage any ideas that come from engaging with it to be posted as part of the inspiring 101 Creative Ideas project run by Ellie Hannan and Chrissi Nerantzi.

You can watch the webinar in full here: http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/p6z1k3tk3rb/ 

Dr Sam Illingworth   Senior Lecturer in Science Communication, Manchester Metropolitan University

Website: www.samillingworth.com
Twitter: @samillingwort

The Poetry of Science If Bowie were a Scientist

TLCs 2016/17: Open Call for contributions

TLCs are free, monthly online webinars (normally 1 hour), organised by a collaboration of colleagues from several UK universities.  There are two main aims to TLCs

  1. To provide an opportunity to share and discuss interesting, creative and innovative practice in learning, teaching and assessment within a supportive and critically friendly academic community.
  2. To experiment with the “webinar” format in the context of providing engaging, interactive and effective continuing professional development experiences for participants and facilitators of TLCs.

We are seeking contributions from colleagues with an interesting idea, project or experience of learning, teaching and/or assessment to contribute to the 2016/17 TLC programme starting in October 2016.

For the 2016/17 series, we are particularly interested in supporting colleagues who have limited experience or who have never delivered a webinar before to do so.  This is quite experimental, as this support will be provided remotely.  This is an exciting new development for TLCs.

Webinar veterans are also very much welcome to submit proposals for contributions.

Please complete and submit your TLC Proposal and the team will contact you asap.

If you have any questions about the TLC open call please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

The TLC Team.

Follow-up to “S & M in Higher Education: Surveys and Metrics” led by Prof. Mark Langan

Many thanks go to Mark for a fabulous session today.  Informed, insightful, inspiring are just a few of the comments I have received from participants.

As requested during the TLC webinar today here are resources and outputs from Mark’s session.

NSS_Feelings_Responses

 

S & M in Higher Education: Surveys and Metrics

A teaching and learning conversation with:

Prof Mark Langan
Prof. Mark Langan,
Manchester Metropolitan University

When: Tuesday 24th May 12:30-13:30 UK Time (60 minutes)

About this conversation:

Higher Education places a great deal of emphasis on the outcomes of student surveys and other metrics associated with student ‘success’. This webinar is an opportunity to discuss metrics, particularly the outputs of the National Student Survey, and the challenge of interpreting them with appropriate context.

About Mark:

Prof Mark Langan (Chair in Higher Education; Associate Dean for Learning Teaching and Quality) is known for creative teaching designs and research into student surveys and other quantitative educational areas such as benchmarking. He has a research background in animal behaviour and evolution, but has focused on HE research for the past decade. Currently he is exploring data from the first ten years of the UK’s National Student Survey, researching student engagement and identifying predictors of student success. He is former editor of journal Bioscience Education, a National Teaching Fellow and Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Selected Publications:

Langan, A. M., N. Scott, S. Partington, and A. Oczujda (2015). Coherence between text comments and the quantitative ratings in the UK’s National Student Survey. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 1-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0309877X.2014.1000281

Langan, A.M., P.J. Dunleavy and A.F. Fielding (2013). Applying Models to National Surveys of Undergraduate Science Students: What Affects Ratings of Satisfaction? Education Sciences, 3, 193-207; doi:10.3390/educsci3020193.http://www.mdpi.com/journal/education

Fielding, A.F., P.J.Dunleavy and A.M. Langan (2010) Effective use of the UK’s National Student (Satisfaction) Survey (NSS) data in science and engineering subjects. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 33, 347-368.

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.