7 X 13 = 28, really? : rethinking how things become a matter of concern

 

Elaine Speight-Burton Elaine Speight-Burton

Language & Learning Advisor at Deakin University

About this conversation:

For almost a decade I have been entangled in a passionate love/hate/**!!?*/ relationship with the practice of academic language and learning (ALL) advising, that curious, vulnerable, risky, field of work that began in Australia, some 60 years ago, as a way of responding to the ‘problem of  difference’ in the university.  Like learning developers in the UK, our work is largely informed by taking an academic literacies approach to support students’ learning by working directly with them and alongside our disciplinary colleagues to clarify and explain the often implicit linguistic and cultural conventions that are valued in (western) academia. Like learning developers, ALL still finds itself caught up in struggles to define what we do, who we are, who we might be and how the institution has defined us.

In this conversation, I invite you to engage in a dreaming of what might happen, if as Maggie MacLure might say, we knocked ‘language’ off her throne for a moment, and began to consider how we might create learning communities that engage with difference, differently.

Taking John Hildson’s conversational lead very carefully; ‘[w]e now know that the continuation and replication of our current political, social and economic arrangements, which construct people primarily as consumers and producers to be the means to achieve the ends of profitability and ‘growth’,  in this conversation I want to explore an imaginary where particular arrangements, the discursive and the socio-material, are mobilised to assemble the self-regulated learner: learners who develop the capability to quality assure themselves as a means to secure institutional profitability and growth.

To do this, I draw on inspirations from the work of Diane Mulcahy and her work on performative knowledge practices to produce the accomplished teacher, (2010, and 2015, 2018), Actor network theory and material politics (Law & Mol 2008).

Come and join me for a very personal, antipodean take on dreaming of multiple learning communities where radically different ways of ‘doing’ and ‘knowing’ are not only possible, they are actually preferred.

Law, J & Mol, A 2008, ‘Globalisation in practice: on the politics of pigswill’, Geoform,vol. 39, no. pp. 133-143.

Law, J 2004, After method: mess in social science research , Routledge, London.

Mulcahy, D 2010, ‘Assembling the accomplished teacher : the performativity and politics of professional teaching standards,’ Educational Philosophy and Theory, vol .43. no. S1, doi: 10.1111/j.14609-5812.2009.00617.x

About Elaine:

Elaine currently works as a language and learning adviser at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia.  Previously she was employed as an academic support and development lecturer at Victoria University, Melbourne where she began acknowledging and working with post-colonial perspectives in education, until the unit was dismantled. From 2009-2012, Elaine worked as a language and academic skills adviser at Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne. There she was employed as a TAFE (VET) teacher in the international division and worked to collaboratively embed language in the curriculum for all first year students, for which, along with her fabulous team, she was recipient of an OLT citation (Australian award for university teaching) in 2012 for Outstanding contributions to student learning: sustained innovation.

Elaine works explores creative analytic practices, performance texts and writing as a method of inquiry.

When: Tuesday 4th June 2019 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Working One to One: Authentically Student-centered Learning Development

Helen Webster

Dr Helen Webster
Head of the Writing Development Centre
Newcastle University

 

About this conversation

Learning Developers, Personal Tutors, Peer Mentors, Dyslexia Tutors, Librarians… Many of us work one to one with students to help them reflect on their learning and develop their academic literacies and wider study skills. Such work often aims to be person-centred, and Learning Development and allied professions are strongly rooted in common values of working in partnership with students through inclusive, emancipatory practice, values that are student-centred and aspirational rather than remedial or deficit. However, in the wider dominant teaching culture of our HE institutions, we are often placed in an implicitly hierarchical relationship with students, “giving advice and guidance”, at odds with these values. Without a clear model for practice to help us enact our values, we risk falling into a quasi-medical model of: Identify the student’s problem (examine), Explain what’s gone wrong (diagnose), Recommend ways to fix it (prescribe). This pathologises the student, depriving them of agency and expertise, and also deprives educators of valuable insight into how students perceive and engage with university study.

This session explores an alternative. It asks how the profession of Clinical Psychology, a branch of mental health practice, has also sought to move away from this ‘doctor knows best’ approach using the core skill of Formulation, and whether it could be adapted for Learning Development one to one practice. Formulation is a method of integrating theory and practice, clinical expertise with the client’s own experience and insight, through its meaning to the client. With a focus on equality, person-centered practice and co-created meaning, it is well aligned to Learning Development values.

We will examine how Formulation would need to be adapted for Learning Development rather than Mental Health practice, and I will propose a model, the Five Ps of LD (Presenting Problem, Pertinent Factors, Perception of Task, Process and Product), which integrates multiple perspectives with longitudinal and cross-sectional socio-cultural factors into a holistic shared understanding of the learning development need and how to move forward. We will look at how this model can be implemented in one to one work and other contexts in a range of student-facing roles in Higher Education.

About Helen

Helen is a Learning Developer, with over 13 years’ experience working with students to develop their academic literacies and become successful independent learners. She is Head of the Writing Development Centre at Newcastle University, and has worked also at Anglia Ruskin, Cambridge and UEA. Her research focusses on developing the theoretical basis on which the new profession of Learning Development rests, creating and adapting models for practice. She is interested in interprofessional working, the intersection between academic, digital and information literacies, and out of all this, creating something in this third space that works for students.

She is a Certified Leading Learning Developer and Senior Fellow of the HEA. As co-chair for the Professional Development working group of the Association of Learning Development in Higher Education, she leads on establishing training in this emerging field of practice. She blogs about her work at https://rattusscholasticus.wordpress.com/

When: Tuesday 2nd April 2019 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

The potential of collage making as a tool for academic development

 

anna-hunter Anna Clare Hunter

Senior Lecturer in Academic Development

University of Central Lancashire

About this conversation:

In this conversation we will be exploring the potential of collage making as a tool for academic development, and for teaching and learning more widely. Drawing on the work of Daphne Loads (2010; 2016; 2017) I will be discussing the importance of such arts based methods for connecting learners with their own perceptions, and enabling connections between individuals to enhance learning communities.

I will be describing my own experience of using collage in the first module of a PGCert Learning and Teaching and reflecting on how my understanding of the practice has developed through time and experience. I will also be identifying different ways in which collage can be used to support student learning and engagement, before widening the discussion to include arts-based strategies more broadly, considering their value for facilitating critical self reflection in learners.

About Anna:

Anna is a Senior Lecturer in Academic Development at the University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK. She has a particular interest in arts-based methods as a tool for supporting the learning and teaching development of academics and draws on collage making, Lego, film, photography and storytelling as some of the strategies to implement this. Anna’s academic background is in English Literature and she actively seeks ways of integrating her subject expertise in narrative and storytelling as a tool for exploring personal experience, with her educational practice.

When: Wednesday 13th March 2019 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Digitally Supported Curriculum

 

Simon_Thomson_Speaking Simon Thomson

Director, Centre for Innovation in Education

University of Liverpool

About this conversation:

I passionately believe that digital tools and services offer fantastic opportunities for learning and teaching. However, in many Universities there is still often a segregation of TEL / E-Learning into separate units or departments and in some cases these are detached from academic or curriculum development services. Alongside this we have, as a sector, segregated the roles in these areas (as an example see my blog post on Learning Technologists https://blog.digis.im/ed-tech/do-we-still-need-learning-technologists/ ).

My research is exploring the effectiveness and impact of the TPACK framework (Mishra & Koehler, 2006) as an academic development and curriculum development framework where we see “digital” as an integrated component of academic development and curriculum design (not a separate component) My work draws upon the discussions around critical digital pedagogy (http://hybridpedagogy.org/critical-digital-pedagogy-definition/ ) and the notion that “it is as much about using digital tools thoughtfully as it is about deciding when not to use digital tools”.

I am proposing that we shift the positivist rhetoric from technology as an “enhancement” to learning (TEL) to one of critical discourse where we consider the use of “digital” as part of the wider curriculum design process through which we integrate digital when and where it adds value and we don’t use digital where it doesn’t.

About Simon:

Simon Thomson is a “flipped academic” (Bruton, 2012) and has a track record for developing and supporting digital pedagogic practice in Higher Education. His academic career has been entirely focussed on teaching excellence and his work is dedicated to improving the staff and student experience.

He has led on a number of funded learning & teaching research projects including a JISC/HEA funded OER project as part of the Phase 1 UKOER programme, an institution-wide pilot of tablet devices evaluating the impact of 1to1 tablet device use and more recently a HEFCE funded project exploring the next generation of digital learning environments. He has presented and published his work at a number of national and international conferences, predominantly in the areas of learning technology and open education.

A passionate advocate of open education almost all of his work is available under a creative commons license (where he is permitted to do so).

Simon was awarded an HEA National Teaching Fellow in 2014 in recognition of his work in Open Education and Digital Pedagogy. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, SEDA accredited in Embedding Learning Technologies and an Apple Distinguished Educator.

You can connect with Simon on Twitter @digisim or through his personal website: https://blog.digis.im

When: Tuesday 26th February 2019 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Learning Development Unboxed?

 

john-hilsdon John Hilsdon

Independent counsellor and academic, formerly Associate Professor and Head of Learning Support and Wellbeing at the University of Plymouth.

About this conversation:

In studying for my doctorate about Learning Development, I was enthused when I came across John Prunty’s criterion for critical analysis in social policy: it should serve the creation of political, social and economic arrangements where “persons are never treated as a means to an end, but treated as ends in their own right.” (Prunty, 1985, p. 136, quoted in Ball, 1997, p. 271). We now know that the continuation and replication of our current political, social and economic arrangements, which construct people primarily as consumers and producers to be the means to achieve the ends of profitability and ‘growth’, for mostly transnational corporations, is leading to potentially catastrophic climate change, amongst other serious global ills. NASA reports that the scientific evidence used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is “unequivocal” on this (Earth Science Communications Team, 2018). So, change is essential to our survival. Can LD be part of the change? In our daily working lives many of us feel boxed in, constrained and unfree. But in working with students and staff we do have opportunities to speak and to act creatively, even if we ‘just’ ask good, critical questions of ourselves and others.

In this conversation I hope to elicit a view of Learning Development based on the notion that our mongrel-like profession, emerging in the UK since the 1990s, can help individuals resist being put into the institutional ‘boxes’ created for them by collectively devising creative learning practices for the benefit of students, staff and, by extension, society beyond the university. In this, I am inspired by Hannah Arendt’s notion of “a world in common” (1958), to see universities as places where we develop learning communities, and thinking outside of rigid boxes with narrow labels like ‘graduate skills’ and ‘employability’; to shape, instead, what Ron Barnett terms “feasible utopias,” albeit starting in small ways or in fleeting moments, to support learning for a sustainable world in common.

Arendt, Hannah (1958) The Human Condition. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.

Ball, Stephen J. (1997) ‘Policy, Sociology and Critical Social Research: a personal review of recent education policy and policy research’, British Educational Research Journal, 23: 3, 257 — 274.

Earth Science Communications Team, NASA (2018) Climate change: How do we know? Webpage: https://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/ accessed 10.01.19

About John:

John works as an independent counsellor and academic, having recently retired from his role as Associate Professor and Head of Learning Support and Wellbeing at the University of Plymouth. He has contributed to the evolution of Learning Development as a distinct field of practice in Higher Education since the turn of the century. He helped set up the UK network of learning developers, LDHEN, in 2002, was the first Chair of ALDinHE from 2006 -2011, and is lead editor of the (JLDHE) Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. He was awarded an HEA National Teaching Fellowship in 2005. John’s work has focussed on issues associated with academic writing, critical thinking, reflection and peer learning. His doctoral study examined Learning Development as a case study of policy and identity construction in UK Higher Education. In addition to his role in HE, John has worked as a counsellor at Derriford Hospital, Plymouth since 2000.

When: Tuesday 22nd January 2019 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Did you hear the one about the stand-up, the preacher and the scriptwriter?

 

 

 simon_lygobaker Dr Simon Lygo-Baker

Senior Lecturer
University of Surrey

About this conversation:

For many years I fought to keep my university identity separate from that I picked up away from campus: living two separate lives. I now believe that as a consequence of this I missed opportunities to draw learning from one context to another and to enhance my role as a teacher. This has now changed and it started when, away from campus, I was listening to a discussion between two stand-up comedians who were talking about the construction of their work. I started to recognise parallels between the development of my own teaching and what the pair were discussing. Since this happened I have shifted my approach to consider the cross-over more frequently, exploring and examining other professions to see what I can learn and bring onto campus from my other life. Using the experience gained from working with a range of seemingly disparate professions, including stand-up comedians, preachers, singing coaches and script writers this session will explore what I have borrowed and then transplanted into my teaching and the higher education environment. I will explore these experiences, using examples from work in the UK and USA with a view to encouraging you to do the same with those people and groups you may engage with away from the university campus.

About Simon:

Simon started working in higher education with different socially excluded groups (refugees, asylum seekers and those in recovery from addiction) on a range of educational projects before joining King’s College London where he developed a range of programmes for academic staff related to learning and teaching. He completed a PhD at the Institute of Education looking at educational values in higher education and now works at the University of Surrey in the Department of Higher Education for nine months a year and at the University of Wisconsin in the School of Veterinary Medicine for the remaining three months.

When: Tuesday 18th December 2018 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

How can I make my online delivery more engaging?

About this conversation:

This session will offer an opportunity for discussion on effective tools and techniques when delivering webinars. This will draw upon experience of supporting various online sessions and workshops on different platforms. Projects such as designing and delivering staff development, disseminating student engagement techniques in distance learning and organising Teaching & Learning Conversations (TLC) events. This involves assisting colleagues in developing engaging and interactive webinars, appropriate delivery techniques, as well as familiarising presenters with the delivery environment.

The conversation will be split into two; the first will cover the core functionality of Adobe Connect to promote participant engagement throughout the process of a webinar.  The second will cover more advanced features found within the tool and how these can be used to enhance participant interaction and collaboration. Due to this, the session will be suitable for beginners new to webinar delivery and intermediates looking to further develop their delivery.

When: Tuesday 16th October 2018 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

About the Presenters:

Matt Thorpe

me

Matt is a Technology Enhanced Learning Advisor in the Faculty of Education at Manchester Metropolitan University within Learning & Research Technologies. His particular areas of interest include learning analytics, blended learning and the role technology can play in the embedding of active learning and formative assessment within pedagogical practice.

 

Steven Williams

11041762_10155330934155249_1207186597262184047_n

Steven is a Technology Enhanced Learning Advisor in the Faculty of Health, Psychology & Social Care at Manchester Metropolitan University within Learning & Research Technologies. Areas of interest are ePortfolios, distance learning, gamification and the solutions that technology can provide in Teaching, Learning and Assessment.

 

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Follow up – Developing the Congruent Educator

Thank you to Emma and all who attended for a fantastic webinar last week. As promised please find below links to Emma’s slides used in the session, a recording of the webinar and some further reading in the area.

Look forward to seeing you all in another TLC soon.

Many thanks, TLC team.

Click here for slides

Click here for webinar recording

Books and Journal Articles

  • GOOD PLACE TO START -> Whitmore, J. (2009). Coaching for performance: GROWing human potential and purpose: The principles and practice of coaching and leadership (4th ed.). London: Nicholas Brealey.
  • Bettinger, E., & Baker, R. (2014). The Effects of Student Coaching. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 36(1), 3-19.
  • Blakey, J., Day, Ian, CIPD, & Ebrary, Inc. (2012). Challenging coaching: Going beyond traditional coaching to face the facts. London; Boston: Nicholas Brealey Pub.
  • Bluckert, P. (2006). Psychological dimensions of executive coaching. Maidenhead: OU/McGraw Hill.
  • Bird, J. (2015).  The are of coaching. Routledge
  • Cooperrider, D. L., Whitney, D., & Stavros, J. M. (2008). Appreciative Inquiry Handbook For Leaders of Change (2nd ed.). Brunswick, USA: Crown Custom Publishing.
  • Downey, M. (1999). Effective coaching (Orion business toolkit). London: Orion Business.
  • Fletcher, S., & Mullen, Carol A. (2012). SAGE handbook of mentoring and coaching in education. Thousand Oaks, Calif.; London: SAGE.
  • Gallwey, T. (1974). The Inner Game of Tennis (1st ed). New York: Random House
  • Goleman, D. (1998). Working with emotional intelligence. London: Bantam Books.
  • Goleman, D., Boyatzis, Richard E, & McKee, Annie. (2004). Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence. Boston, Ma.: Harvard Business School Press.
  • Grover, S., & Furnham, A. (2016). Coaching as a Developmental Intervention in Organisations: A Systematic Review of Its Effectiveness and the Mechanisms Underlying It. PLOS ONE, PLOS ONE , 11 (7).
  • Kimsey-House, K., Kimsey-House, H., Sandahl, P., & Whitworth, L. (2011). Co-Active Coaching (3rd ed.). London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing.
  • Landsberg, M. (2003). The Tao of Coaching: Boost Your Effectiveness at Work by Inspiring and Developing Those Around You. Profile Books.
  • Rogers, J. (2008). Coaching Skills: a handbook, Maidenhead: OU/McGraw Hill.
  • Stork, A. (2015). Becoming an Outstanding Personal Tutor. Critical Publishing Ltd
  • Van Nieuwerburgh, C. (2012). Coaching in education: Getting better results for students, educators, and parents (Professional coaching series). London: Karnac Books.

Online resources

Developing the Congruent Educator

 

emma gillaspy

 

 

Emma Gillaspy

Digital Teaching & Learning Manager
School of Health & Society – University of Salford

 

About this conversation:

This webinar will explore the potential for taking a coaching approach to learning and teaching development and how we can work holistically with individual’s strengths to ensure they are happy, satisfied and performing at their best.

emma-gillaspy-1.pngAcademia is facing a period of sustained and unprecedented change. A recent global study by Roland Persson from Jönköping University reported by Times Higher Education (2017) showed that stress in academia is on the rise due to increased workload and a lack of support.

Whitmore (2009) defines coaching as “unlocking people’s potential to maximize their own performance”. Coaching has been shown to positively impact psychological factors such as reducing stress and improving wellbeing and resilience (Grover & Furnham, 2016). Common outcomes from coaching include increased self-efficacy, performance and satisfaction (Jarvis, 2008). Coaching is becoming more widely used across the Higher Education (HE) sector. This includes coaching support for senior management and increasing provision for researchers (Medd, 2012). However there is very little research into the efficacy of academic coaching for improving learning and teaching practice.

I propose that coaching may be a positive developmental intervention that can improve confidence and competence in teaching. During this webinar, we will:

  • investigate the benefits and challenges of adopting a coaching approach
  • try out a range of coaching tools and techniques that encourage academic development
  • debate the feasibility of adopting a coaching approach for improving learning and teaching practice

emma gillaspy - 2.png

About Emma:
I am passionate about helping people realise their potential through leading academic career development and executive coaching. I’m a co-founder of #coachingHE, a qualified executive coach and facilitator of coaching skills development. I am currently Digital Teaching & Learning Manager in the School of Health & Society at the University of Salford.

As an advocate of social media, I encourage experimentation in blended learning through creative, experiential and heutagogical approaches. I teach across a wide range of topics including education, social and digital media, personal effectiveness, communication, leadership and public engagement.

Before moving into the field of academic and researcher development, I worked in the NHS as a clinical molecular geneticist following graduation from my PhD studying the genetics of osteoarthritis.

Continue the conversation with me on Twitter @egillaspy or LinkedIn.

 References

Whitmore, J. (2009) Coaching for Performance: GROWing Human Potential and Purpose. London; Boston, Nicholas Brealey Publishing.

When: Wednesday 11th July 2018 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

ALDinHE Virtual Symposia

We are pleased to promote an upcoming virtual symposia that our colleagues at ALDinHE will be running over the next few weeks. Please find details of the event below…

ALDinHE Logo

ALDinHE are pleased to share details of our first ALDinHE “cyberspace”
regional symposia.

Due to the range of experience and interest, we have decided to run two webinars.
Whatever your level of experience and practice, whether you want to present and/or
participate, you are very welcome to sign up for both webinars (or just one). If you would like to present, please provide details when you sign up, including a title and overview of your 10-15 minute presentation. Remember we are interested in hearing about the good, the bad and the ugly. Please don’t feel you can only present if you pulled off the “perfect” webinar.

If you have any queries before signing up, please contact: sandie.donnelly@cumbria.ac.uk

ALDinHE webinar 1: Getting started

Tuesday 26/6/28 – 13:00 – 15:30
(timings include comfort breaks). If you would like to present, please sign up by Monday
18/6/18.

· Have you had a go at webinars? Please share your experiences of how you got
started with webinars and what recommendations you would make to those of us
starting out.
· Are you interested in hosting and facilitating webinars but would you like to know
more from people who have had a go? Join this webinar to share your questions
and queries.
Sign up for this virtual symposium to explore getting started with webinars, including
shared experiences of: platforms, pitfalls, positives, tips for beginners and more. (Should
the embedded link not work, please use: https://goo.gl/forms/obkgGGJTY9gDq9MV2)

ALDinHE webinar 2: Enhancing webinar design and practice 

Tuesday 24/7/18 – 13:30 – 15:30
(timings include comfort breaks). If you would like to present, please sign up by Friday 13/7/18

· Have you been hosting and/or participating in webinars for a while and would like
to share your practice and/or experiences of webinars – the good, the bad and the
ugly?
· What do we need to consider in webinar design to engage learners and
participants?
· What about webinars and accessibility?
· How do we manage webinars to increase participation in the webinar?
· How do we avoid webinars being one-hit wonders and encourage return learners
to sign up for more?
· Do we record webinars to share with learners who didn’t participate – why?
· How might we use webinars to share/promote our practice with our colleagues
and peers – within our own institutions as well as beyond?
· Have you got an idea for a webinar that you’d like to run past a supportive and
constructive community? Take the opportunity to sign up for a “sounding board”
slot.

Whether you are a seasoned webinar designer/practitioner or are just interested in
learning more about webinars, sign up for this virtual symposium to explore enhancing
webinar design and practice. (Should the embedded link not work, please use:
https://goo.gl/forms/L6k7WO9xAdYTWskv1)