Next #tlcwebinar > 22 March 17 discussing the use of action research to enhance teaching practice with Dr Helena Kettleborough

A teaching and learning conversation with:

About this conversation: We will explore together how action research can be used to adopt a scholarly approach for ongoing enhancement of our teaching practice.

helena-kettleborough-crop-145x145-588f262711dc8About Helena: Dr. Helena Mary Kettleborough teaches responsible enterprise and sustainability at Manchester Metropolitan University. Helena has a long standing commitment to action research as a tool to improve teaching, develop reflection and help grow an ecologically, socially and economically sustainable world. Helena was an enthusiastic participant on the CELT Creativity Module and co-creates with three colleagues, exploring ‘I love learning’ and using first and second person action research. Helena was awarded Outstanding Teacher in Sustainability in the MMU Student Union Awards 2016 and  gained her PhD from Lancaster Business School and is now working to publish the research.   Helena’s first career was as a senior manager in Local Authorities delivering community development and neighbourhood regeneration services and she is an active volunteer in her local inner city neighbourhood and delivers workshops on biodiversity loss.

When: Wednesday 22nd March 2017 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation: Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Capturing learning: beyond the acquisition metaphor

A teaching and learning conversation with:

 paul_orsmond Paul Orsmond 

Senior lecturer in the School of Life Sciences and Education at Staffordshire University

 rachel_forsyth Rachel Forsyth

Associate Head of CELT, Manchester Metropolitan, University

About this conversation:

This conversation is intended to provoke discussion about the role of assessment in higher education. A common model of higher education characterises the role of the teacher as delivering the curriculum to support achievement of learning outcomes; this tends to place primary, value on what is taught in the identified curriculum, with a much lesser value for what students learn outside this. The focus is on ‘getting a qualification’, and the teacher’s role is to help students to do this. Hence learning is seen as an individual event, using an acquisition metaphor to show how  value has been added the students’ knowledge and capabilities. Participation may be covered by the occasional group project, possibly added into the curriculum in a slightly clumsy way, to tick the outcome of ‘work in teams’.  Here learning gain is seen as an accumulation of acquired knowledge. Another model sees an undergraduate programme of study as bringing about a change in identity and providing the student with the ability to integrate into one or more communities of practice, which were inaccessible to the student before beginning the course. Here  the emphasis to be placed on learning through the participation – thus knowledge is not just something the student possesses but something a student does. Here learning gain is seen more in terms of students moving from being legitimate peripheral participants towards becoming more full members of a community of practice.

Current models of assessment in UK HE tend to favour the first of these models, but in so doing may only assess a tiny portion of all that students learn at university. This conversation hopes to more fully explore the learning that occurs in university through student identity development.

About Paul and Rachel:

Paul is a senior lecturer in the School of Life Sciences and Education at Staffordshire University.  As an educator in biosciences he has explored student learning and how it is linked to assessment and feedback.  In particular he has been interested in communities of learning that students develop and the social interaction that they undertake outside the overt curriculum while carrying out self- and peer-assessment practices in order to make sense of their learning experiences.

Rachel works in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University.  She is particularly interested in quality assurance, curriculum management and assessment in higher education.

When: Monday 6th March 2017 12:30-13:30 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Next #tlcwebinar 31 Jan 17: Exploring the Ecology of Teaching & Learning in Higher Education with Prof. Norman Jackson

A teaching and learning conversation with:

 4286355 Prof. Norman Jackson 

Founder of Lifewide Education and

Creative Academic

About this conversation:

This contribution to TLC provides an opportunity to explore a bunch of ideas that try to develop an ecological perspective on higher education teaching and learning practices, particularly those pedagogic practices that encourage learners to use and develop their creativity. The session is formed around a series of concepts and propositions interspersed with activities and opportunities for discussion to enable ideas to be considered and evaluated.

Activity 1: Prior to the TLC event it would be really helpful if participants could create a short (eg about 200 words) narrative or annotated sketch of an approach they have used in their own pedagogic practice to encourage students to use their creativity. This will provide a resource that can be analysed and reflected upon during and after the conversation.

It would be great if these could be shared on the #creativeHE Google+platform which we are using to explore the idea of pedagogies for creativity.

https://plus.google.com/communities/110898703741307769041

About Norman:

Norman Jackson is Emeritus Professor of the University of Surrey and Founder of the Lifewide Education and Creative Academic social enterprises. The two most important features of his educational work reflect a concern for the lifewide (whole of life) dimension of learning and personal development, and the need to nurture learners’ creative development as well as their academic development. Both of these concerns are addressed in his current work to develop and apply the idea of learning ecologies to teaching and learning practices through the ‘Exploring Creative Pedagogies for Creative Learning Ecologies’ open learning project http://www.creativeacademic.uk/2016-17-programme.html   You can find out more about his work at: http://www.normanjackson.co.uk/  http://www.lifewideeducation.uk/  and http://www.creativeacademic.uk/

When: Tuesday 31st January 2017 12:00-13:00 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

1minutecpd – Follow-up post

The webinar that Chris and I hosted was an exploration of our 1minuteCPD project. 1minuteCPD is a yearlong experiment in micro learning to address digital capabilities in Higher Education. It is openly available and has been created by colleagues from Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester (see: Meet the authors).

Chris and I were really pleased to have this opportunity to discuss the 1minuteCPD project more widely with the HE community. It was great to see so many attendees to the webinar, from all over the world, engaged in a lively discussion about the merits and challenges of 1minuteCPD and micro-learning more generally. A recording of our TLC is now available on the website and you may also be interested in the recording of our recent presentation on 1minutecpd at ALT-C in September.

From our perspective, we were really interested to learn what brought people to 1minuteCPD and what encouraged them to keep coming back. During the discussions, it appeared that many people believed that the length of the posts was essential to its success and that longer posts, even to just 5 minutes, would not have been as popular. Others felt that longer posts could have an appeal, especially if they could link more explicitly to the pedagogy, however most agreed they would not engage with a longer format on a daily basis. For those interested in a slightly longer format, check out the great resource www.telu.me, which has been created by a consortium of Universities based in Ireland.

It was great to see that many would like to see 1minuteCPD become more of a community led project and has certainly given us food for thought. If you have any suggestions as to how 1minuteCPD could be opened up to the community, we would love to hear your ideas.

Kate & Chris

Please contact us on k.soper@mmu.ac.uk or c.meadows@mmu.ac.uk or on Twitter @KatesSoper @cjmeadows

Using social media for belonging and bonding

A teaching and learning conversation with:

 danielle_dhayer Danielle D’Hayer 

Associate professor Interpreting Studies at London Metropolitan University

About this conversation:

Do you remember the excitement of joining a new course? Do you also remember how nervous you were the day before coming to class? How easy was it to engage in a conversation with classmates? Not even to mention the tutor?

Well, it does not have to be like that.

First, because tutors are as nervous as students. But this is a well-kept secret.

Second, because new technologies and social media allow us to connect, interact, contribute, listen, learn and socialise at any time and anywhere.

They key question is: how do I connect with students and peers using new technologies? What social media should I consider? Isn’t this dangerous or even a waste of time? Don’t we have enough to do already? Does it really work?

Add these questions to yours and the one hour webinar will feel like 5 minutes.

Why don’t you join us to try to answer these questions together? I don’t guarantee we find all the answers but I am certain we can share some good experience and tips.

I will share 3 main case studies with you:

1.     Meeting on Google Communities before, during and after the course

2.     Twitter: an invitation to bond beyond the classroom

3.     Virtual classes: moving from competition to collaboration.

We can already start our conversation on Twitter if you wish. Follow me on Twitter @DDhayer. We can use the official hashtag #tlcwebinars

About Danielle:

I am Associate professor Interpreting Studies at London Metropolitan University and the course leader for the MA Conference Interpreting and the MA Interpreting. I am a trained interpreter myself.

I am a PhD student. The title of my thesis is: ‘In what ways do (virtual) Communities of Practice facilitate successful learning in the context of professional development for interpreting students and practitioners?’

I have been using new technologies in the classroom since 2008. Technologies and social media are now fully integrated to our daily activities. As such, I have tried to integrate them to our daily formal and informal interactions to enhance not only the learning experience but also the way we interact within and beyond the boundaries of the classroom.  I try to create learning spaces and offer opportunities to safely experiment interactions that may inspire students, staff, alumni and employers connected to the course to grow together. Learning on a course and the classroom experience are only a wonderful excuse to discover new selves, new horizons and elaborate new visions of the world we live in.

When: Tuesday 13th December 2016 12:30-13:30 (UK Time)

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

1minuteCPD: Experimenting with micro-learning

A teaching and learning conversation with:

kate_soper
Kate SoperManchester Metropolitan University
chris_meadowsChris Meadows

Manchester Metropolitan University

When: Tuesday 22nd November 12:00-13:00 UK Time (60 minutes)

About this conversation:

1minuteCPD is an openly shared, staff development project designed and developed by colleagues from Manchester Metropolitan University and The University of Manchester. Taking a head-on approach to the “no time” excuse for not engaging in staff development, 1minuteCPD has explored micro-learning as a method for developing digital capabilities in higher education.

This webinar is a chance to discuss the lessons learnt from 1minuteCPD, the merits and challenges of micro-learning for teaching and learning more widely, and explore what’s next on the 1minuteCPD journey.

If you are aware of any research papers in micro-learning, please feel free to share these during the webinar.

About Kate and Chris:

Kate and Chris are part of the wider 1minuteCPD team (See: Meet the authors). Both currently work at Manchester Metropolitan University as Technology Enhanced Learning Advisors. In their roles, they are responsible for the development of staff around learning technologies and exploring the pedagogical applications of technology within Higher Education.

Selected Publications:

 

1minutecpd blog page: https://1minutecpd.wordpress.com/

Meet the authors: Meet the authors

1minuteCPD:  A year of Micro learning (ALT Blog): https://altc.alt.ac.uk/blog/2016/02/5459/#gref

Joining the conversation:

Simply follow this link http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/ and enter as a guest by typing your name, institution and country into the name field and clicking on the “Join Meeting” button.

Whether or not you have previously participated in a webinar or online activity using Adobe Connect we advise that you make sure that you do some checking and preparation in advance. Check your set-up and connection here.

You may also find our Adobe Connect Webinar Participant Guide useful to print out in advance of the session.We really hope that you will be able to join for what should be a lively and highly interactive TLC.

Sam Illingworth reflects on his TLC, using poetry in teaching

The webinar that I hosted as part of the Teaching and Learning Conversations was designed to introduce ways of using poetry in higher educational teaching. It was a really enjoyable webinar to host, as there was plenty of discussion and a passionate (and at times rapid) sharing of ideas. I had hoped that the webinar would help to demystify the use of poetry in the classroom, and that it would encourage people that poetry is a beautiful, thought-provoking and fun medium.

At the beginning of the webinar a couple of the participants expressed their apprehension and fear of poetry, especially in relation to analysing and writing poetry, but by using a simple analytical tool (based on the first verse of this Rudyard Kipling poem) everyone was soon very much engaged in pulling apart the following poem from the American Beat Poet Richard Brautigan:

At the California Institute of Technology
I don’t care how God-damn smart
these guys are: I’m bored.

It’s been raining like hell all day long
and there’s nothing to do.

There were some really interesting discussions in terms of how the poem made people feel, who they thought was writing it, and why they liked/disliked it. By the end of the discussion the participants were beginning to feel more comfortable with analysing poetry, and judging from their responses it was clear that they were making connections with their own experiences and learning journeys, which is exactly what poetry has the capacity to do!

After writing some fun acrostic poems for the TLC acronym there was a group discussion in which numerous suggestions for how to use poetry in a higher education setting were made. All of the contributions were innovative, but I particularly enjoyed the idea of using poetry to explore other people’s perspective, as this can be an extremely powerful tool and chimes with some of the wonderful work that Kirsten Jack is doing at Manchester Met with student nurses and poetry. I also really liked the suggestion of a lunchtime poetry club, which is something that I hope we can develop over the coming weeks for the higher education community, so watch this space!

By the end of the session I think that I had managed to convince the participants that poetry is anything but scary, and that it has the potential to really open up discussions amongst students, and can even help to develop engagement. A link to the webinar can be found below, and I encourage any ideas that come from engaging with it to be posted as part of the inspiring 101 Creative Ideas project run by Ellie Hannan and Chrissi Nerantzi.

You can watch the webinar in full here: http://mmu.adobeconnect.com/p6z1k3tk3rb/ 

Dr Sam Illingworth   Senior Lecturer in Science Communication, Manchester Metropolitan University

Website: www.samillingworth.com
Twitter: @samillingwort

The Poetry of Science If Bowie were a Scientist

TLCs 2016/17: Open Call for contributions

TLCs are free, monthly online webinars (normally 1 hour), organised by a collaboration of colleagues from several UK universities.  There are two main aims to TLCs

  1. To provide an opportunity to share and discuss interesting, creative and innovative practice in learning, teaching and assessment within a supportive and critically friendly academic community.
  2. To experiment with the “webinar” format in the context of providing engaging, interactive and effective continuing professional development experiences for participants and facilitators of TLCs.

We are seeking contributions from colleagues with an interesting idea, project or experience of learning, teaching and/or assessment to contribute to the 2016/17 TLC programme starting in October 2016.

For the 2016/17 series, we are particularly interested in supporting colleagues who have limited experience or who have never delivered a webinar before to do so.  This is quite experimental, as this support will be provided remotely.  This is an exciting new development for TLCs.

Webinar veterans are also very much welcome to submit proposals for contributions.

Please complete and submit your TLC Proposal and the team will contact you asap.

If you have any questions about the TLC open call please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

The TLC Team.

Using poetry in teaching #TLCwebinar with Dr Sam Illingworth, join us on the 18 Oct, 1.30pm UK time

Dear colleagues,

The TLCs are back after the summer break. We now have a presence on Twitter. Please check out @tlcwebinars and follow if you like ;).

Our very first TLC this year is with Dr Sam Illingworth who will introduce us to the world of poetry in teaching. This will take place on the 18th of October, 1.30-2.30pm.

The direct link to the webinar room is https://mmu.adobeconnect.com/tlc/

Here is Sam’s introduction for the webinar: 

In this interactive session, Dr Sam Illingworth, Senior Lecturer in Science Communication at Manchester Metropolitan University, discusses how poetry can be used as a facilitatory tool to explore a variety of subjects in higher education.

A few words about Sam: 

showoff11-350x350Dr Sam Illingworth is a Senior Lecturer in Science Communication at Manchester Metropolitan University. His research is concerned with empowering members of society with science using a variety of different media, including poetry and theatre. As well as researching and publishing peer-reviewed papers in the area, Sam is also a practitioner and an award-winning poet and spoken word artist in his own right. He writes a regular blog in which he communicates recent research via the medium of poetry to the general public (http://thepoetryofscience.scienceblog.com/). Sam is also an experienced teacher and workshop facilitator; as well as being the Programme Leader on Manchester Met’s MSc in Science Communication he is a fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He has experience of running poetry workshops for a wide variety of audiences, from primary school children through to scientists working in research institutions. He was recently commission by the European City of Science to pair scientists and poets to deliver an evening of science poetry as part of the city’s celebrations. He also ran a series of successful workshops on poetry writing and performance at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly (Europe’s largest geosciences conference with approximately 14,000 participants) in April 2016, culminating in a performance of poetry by scientists to a pack crowd of ~300 other scientists. More information about Sam’s research, teaching and public engagement expertise can be found on his website: http://www.samillingworth.com/

We are really looking forward to discussing poetry with Dr Sam Illingworth and all of you.

The TLCteam

 

Follow-up to “S & M in Higher Education: Surveys and Metrics” led by Prof. Mark Langan

Many thanks go to Mark for a fabulous session today.  Informed, insightful, inspiring are just a few of the comments I have received from participants.

As requested during the TLC webinar today here are resources and outputs from Mark’s session.

NSS_Feelings_Responses